The African Union Commission agenda 2063: The Africa we want

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Publication Date: 
31 May 2014
Abstract: 

Agenda 2063, a plan for Africa's structural transformation, was agreed upon by the African Union Golden Jubilee of May 2013. The Summit tasked the African Union Commission (AUC), supported by the New Partnership for Africa‘s Development (NEPAD) Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA), the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), to prepare such a continental agenda through a people-driven process.

Agenda 2063, a plan for Africa's structural transformation, was agreed upon by the African Union Golden Jubilee of May 2013. The Summit tasked the African Union Commission (AUC), supported by the New Partnership for Africa‘s Development (NEPAD) Planning and Coordinating Agency (NPCA), the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), to prepare such a continental agenda through a people-driven process.

The 50th Anniversary Solemn Declaration incorporates a pledge to make progress in eight priority areas. These priorities definethe continental agenda and will be integrated intoregional and national development plans.

The Eight Priorities of the 50th Anniversary Solemn Declaration

  1. African identity and renaissance
  2. Continue the struggle against colonialism and the right to self-determination
  3. The integration agenda
  4. Agenda for social and economic development
  5. Peace and security agenda
  6. Democratic governance
  7. Determining Africa's destiny
  8. Africa's place in the world

Agenda 2063 takes account of past achievements and challenges as well asthe continental and global context in which the continental transformation is being implemented, including:

  • The durability of the Pan African vision and project, which guided struggles of African people and their descendants against slavery, colonialism, apartheid and racial discrimination; the commitment of the founders of the OAU to self-determination, integration, solidarity and unity; and which today forms the backdrop for Africa‘s renaissance, transformation and integration.
  • Lessons from global developmental experiences, the significant advances by major countries of the South to lift huge sections of their populations out of poverty, improve incomes and catalyze economic and social transformation, and the global drive through the United Nations to find multi-lateral approaches to humanity‘s most pressing concerns including human security and peace; the eradication of poverty, hunger and disease; and climate change.
  • An African turning point, with the end of the Cold War and the destruction of apartheid in Namibia and South Africa, which saw a renewed determination to end wars and conflicts, to build shared prosperity, to integrate, to build responsive and democratic governance and to end the continent‘s marginalization through the adoption of the New Partnership for Africa‘s Development and the transformation of the OAU into the African Union. Thus Africa over the last decade has experienced sustained levels of growth, greater peace and stability and positive movements on a number of human development indicators.Africa must sustain and consolidate this positive turnaround, using it as a springboard to ensure its transformation and renaissance.
  • The continuities and changes of the African development paradigm and dynamics, reflected in post-independence state and nation-building, industrialization and modernization efforts, the fight against disease, ignorance and poverty; and the push for integration, as captured in the OAU Charter, the Monrovia Declaration, the Lagos Plan of Action and NEPAD; captured in sectoral policy frameworks, strategies and architectures including agriculture, peace and security, infrastructure, science and technology, governance, industrialization, education, social policy, culture, sports and health and in normative frameworks around human and people‘s, children‘s and women's rights.
  • The need for people-centered development and gender equality, which places the African people at the center of all continental efforts, to ensure their participation in the transformation of the continent, and to build caring and inclusive societies. It recognizes that no society can reach its full potential, unless it empowers women and remove all obstacles to women‘s full participation in all areas of human endeavors; and unless it provides an enabling environment for its children and young people to flourish and reach their full potential.
  • The ebbs and flows of the global context, and in our times the modern information technology revolution, globalization and changes in productionchanges and advances in technology, production, trade, knowledge and labour markets; the opportunities presented by global demographic trends and the growing global middle and working classes in emerging and developing countries and regions; the move towards multi-polarity with strong elements of uni-polarism remaining, global security and the impact of climate change. Humanity today has the capacities, technology and know-how to ensure a decent standard of living and human security for all inhabitants of our earth, and yet children continue to die of preventable diseases, hunger and malnutrition remain part of the human experience, and underdevelopment, marginalization and inequality between regions and countries and within countries persist.